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FAQ

How can I check my promotion points?

The Member Profile information is still available on the Administration website which is now running at http://admin.netra.org. The old site will remain available mainly for membership and scoring administration. Eventually all services will be migrated to this new website.

How can I manage my club members like we had on the old website?

Club Management is still available on the Administration website which is now running at http://admin.netra.org. The Administration website will remain available mainly for membership and scoring administration. Eventually all services will be upgraded and migrated to this server.

What is an Enduro?

An Enduro is a meet where speed is not the determining factor and where a time schedule has to be maintained: it is
not a race. It is conducted over little-used roads, trails, footpaths and all other types of terrain. The typical Enduro
contains sections of unimproved natural terrain linked by public roads. Usually three or four riders are started each
minute, with a set speed average, on a course marked with arrows. Each rider is given a route sheet with directions
and scheduled arrival times for each turn. The rider who can follow the course, has the skill and endurance to
negotiate difficult terrain, and can use his odometer and watch to stay on schedule, will be successful. “Checks” are
located along the course to monitor the rider’s ability to stay on schedule. Riders are penalized for being late or early
at a check. Late points provide a way to determine who the best riders are; early points exist primarily to prevent
speeding on public roads. The organizer sets up a course that will challenge the rider, making even the fastest riders
late in some sections, yet placing checks and resets (see below) so as to discourage speeding on speed limited
sections. Courses are typically 50 to 120 miles long, with at least one gas stop. Permission must be obtained by the
organizer from the owners of private property, or land manager in case of public land, where the course crosses such
property.

New England Trail Rider Association (NETRA) Enduros use two timekeeping systems: (1) American Motorcyclist
Association (AMA) Schedule and (2) New England Interval (NEI) Brand X Schedule. The rider should familiarize
himself with them before attempting to ride an Enduro. NETRA sanctioned events using the AMA timekeeping
format will adhere to the NETRA Rulebook and follow event procedures outlined for NETRA Enduros with
exceptions to the AMA timekeeping format as outlined in the NETRA rulebook. The AMA rulebook will not take
precedence at a NETRA sanctioned Enduro.

Download the complete NETRA Enduro Rule Book

What is a Hare Scramble?

A Hare Scramble is a meet over any course, preferably cross country, where rider ability is the determining factor,
and no time schedule is followed. The course shall include roads, dirt roads, trails, footpaths, up and down hill, or
any other type of terrain, which can be negotiated by a motorcycle. The course should be a closed course, between 5
and 20 miles in length, with the number of laps determined by the promoting club. The riders go through a check
each lap, at which the rider’s laps are counted. Additional checks may be added to prevent course cutting.

Download the complete NETRA Hare Scrambles Rule Book

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